Dream the impossible dream PDF Print E-mail
News - Final Word
Thursday, 22 March 2012 06:19
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"I can’t believe that!” said Alice.

"Can’t you?” the queen said in a pitying tone. “Try again, draw a long breath, and shut your eyes.”
Alice laughed. “There’s no use trying,” she said. “One can’t believe impossible things.”

"I daresay you haven’t much practice,” said the queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes, I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

I wonder how many generations of children marvelled at this conversation between Alice and the queen from Lewis Carroll’s book, ‘Through the Looking-Glass’ (Alice in Wonderland).

And I wonder how many generations of adults have stopped marvelling about it. Sure, the dialogue is a bit out there, but that’s precisely why it should be taken as a sort of prescription meds re-read at least once a year.

In her book - ‘The Four-Fold Way’ - author, anthropologist, educator and corporate consultant Angeles Arrien refers to the conversation between Alice and the queen. She says that the queen takes a no-nonsense approach to dreaming the impossible dream.

By the way, in her book Angeles uses four archetypal ways to explain a certain approach to life. These are The Way of the Warrior, The Way of the Healer, The Way of the Visionary and The Way of the Teacher. The four basic principles include: Show up or choose to be present (Warrior), pay attention to what has heart and meaning (Healer), tell the truth without blame or judgment (Visionary), and be open, rather than attached to the outcome (Teacher).

Say you numbered these principles from one to four, where number one should be the most developed in your character and four the least. What would you discover about yourself? Well, I can tell you that non-attachment to outcome is probably the biggest challenge when dreaming the impossible dream.

According to Mike Dooley, from ‘Notes from the Universe’ fame, when it comes to dreams you have to know what you want, defined in terms of the end result with as much clarity as possible. Then you have to physically move towards it, without defining the hows.

Of course you don’t know how, he says. It’s okay that you don’t know how. See, if you have this set little recipe of how things are supposed to work, you might just miss the value in anything that refuses to conform to your recipe. And that might be the very thing that will make your dream come true.

Life coach Lorraine Cohen says one has to tune into your inner wisdom, intuition and instincts to follow those nudges that might be showing you the way to opportunities that will lead towards your dream. She says she’s found that taking the first step opens the door to the next.

And while dreaming this impossible dream, please beware of party poopers. Surely you know what or, maybe more aptly, who I mean in your life. Throughout our lives, we will continue encountering individuals who presume to know what is best for us. Most of us are born into situations like that.

Just remember, however negative an influence these know-betters might seem to exert, whenever people come into our lives, they have come for a reason. Author Madisyn Taylor says they turn up to show us something about ourselves that we have not been able to see.

“When unhealthy people try to hook us into their patterns with mind games and power trips, we can remind ourselves that we have something to learn here . . . This takes the focus off the troubling individual and puts it back on us, giving us the opportunity to change the situation from the inside out,” Madisyn writes.

It is only when we do not use our inborn wisdom that we begin to doubt our personal truths and are driven to outside sources of information; much like the one Alice came upon.
One day Alice came to a fork in the road and saw a Cheshire cat in a tree.

"Would you tell me which way I ought to go from here?” asked Alice.

"That depends a good deal on where you want to get,” said the cat.

"I really don’t care where” replied Alice.

"Then it doesn’t much matter which way you go,” said the cat.

 

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